Books, Books, Books!
Synopsis (lifted from here):

New York Times bestselling author Tess Gerritsen knows how to expertly dissect a brilliantly suspenseful story, all the while keeping fascinated readers riveted to her side. By turns darkly enthralling and relentlessly surprising, Keeping the Dead showcases an author at the peak of her storytelling powers. For untold years, the perfectly preserved mummy had lain forgotten in the dusty basement of Boston’s Crispin Museum. Now its sudden rediscovery by museum staff is both a major coup and an attention-grabbing mystery. Dubbed ‘Madam X,’ the mummy‘“to all appearances, an ancient Egyptian artifact‘“seems a ghoulish godsend for the financially struggling institution. But medical examiner Maura Isles soon discovers a macabre message hidden within the corpse‘“horrifying proof that this ‘centuries-old’ relic is instead a modern-day murder victim.To Maura and Boston homicide detective Jane Rizzoli, the forensic evidence is unmistakable, its implications terrifying. And when the grisly remains of yet another woman are found in the hidden recesses of the museum, it becomes chillingly clear that a maniac is at large‘“and is now taunting them.
Archaeologist Josephine Pulcillo’s blood runs cold when the killer’s cryptic missives are discovered, and her darkest dread becomes real when the carefully preserved corpse of yet a third victim is left in her car like a gruesome offering‘“or perhaps a ghastly promise of what’s to come.The twisted killer’s familiarity with post-mortem rituals suggests to Maura and Jane that he may have scientific expertise in common with Josephine. Only Josephine knows that her stalker shares a knowledge even more personally terrifying: details of a dark secret she had thought forever buried.Now Maura must summon her own dusty knowledge of ancient death traditions to unravel his twisted endgame. And when Josephine vanishes, Maura and Jane have precious little time to derail the Archaeology Killer before he adds another chilling piece to his monstrous collection.

Good - yes.
Gripping - yes.
Plausible - yes.
Page turner - yes,
Keeper - no
I do like Gerritsen. I just cannot be bothered to re-read her books. And if I don’t want to read a book again, why keep it?

Synopsis (lifted from here):

New York Times bestselling author Tess Gerritsen knows how to expertly dissect a brilliantly suspenseful story, all the while keeping fascinated readers riveted to her side. By turns darkly enthralling and relentlessly surprising, Keeping the Dead showcases an author at the peak of her storytelling powers.

For untold years, the perfectly preserved mummy had lain forgotten in the dusty basement of Boston’s Crispin Museum. Now its sudden rediscovery by museum staff is both a major coup and an attention-grabbing mystery. Dubbed ‘Madam X,’ the mummy‘“to all appearances, an ancient Egyptian artifact‘“seems a ghoulish godsend for the financially struggling institution. But medical examiner Maura Isles soon discovers a macabre message hidden within the corpse‘“horrifying proof that this ‘centuries-old’ relic is instead a modern-day murder victim.

To Maura and Boston homicide detective Jane Rizzoli, the forensic evidence is unmistakable, its implications terrifying. And when the grisly remains of yet another woman are found in the hidden recesses of the museum, it becomes chillingly clear that a maniac is at large‘“and is now taunting them.

Archaeologist Josephine Pulcillo’s blood runs cold when the killer’s cryptic missives are discovered, and her darkest dread becomes real when the carefully preserved corpse of yet a third victim is left in her car like a gruesome offering‘“or perhaps a ghastly promise of what’s to come.

The twisted killer’s familiarity with post-mortem rituals suggests to Maura and Jane that he may have scientific expertise in common with Josephine. Only Josephine knows that her stalker shares a knowledge even more personally terrifying: details of a dark secret she had thought forever buried.

Now Maura must summon her own dusty knowledge of ancient death traditions to unravel his twisted endgame. And when Josephine vanishes, Maura and Jane have precious little time to derail the Archaeology Killer before he adds another chilling piece to his monstrous collection.

  • Good - yes.
  • Gripping - yes.
  • Plausible - yes.
  • Page turner - yes,
  • Keeper - no

I do like Gerritsen. I just cannot be bothered to re-read her books. And if I don’t want to read a book again, why keep it?

From the Cover:

Something peculiar is happening. Stockholm is unduring a heatwave, electrical appliances cannot be switched off and everyone has a blinding headache. Then the terrible news breaks - in the city morgue, the dead are waking…
David always knew his wife was far too good for him. But he never knew how lost be’d be without her until tonight when her car hit an elk. Now she’s one and he’s alone. But when he goes to identify her body, she begins to move. It’s terrifying, but it gives David a strange kind of hope.
Across the city, grieving families find themselves able to see their loved ones one last time. But are these creatures really them? How long can this last? And what does it all mean?
Handling the Undead is a thrilling, shocking and moving story about a love that can defy death from the acclaimed author of Let the Right One In.

I like the way Lindqvist writes. But he does not finish his stories in a way I like. Both Right One and Undead have endings that feel, to me, rushed. Tacked on because, damn it, books have to end somewhere.
Up to that point, an excellent read. After that point, a disappointment. I would recommend them anyway - you might like the endings, not feel dissatisfied the way I did. And the writing itself is superb.

From the Cover:

Something peculiar is happening. Stockholm is unduring a heatwave, electrical appliances cannot be switched off and everyone has a blinding headache. Then the terrible news breaks - in the city morgue, the dead are waking…

David always knew his wife was far too good for him. But he never knew how lost be’d be without her until tonight when her car hit an elk. Now she’s one and he’s alone. But when he goes to identify her body, she begins to move. It’s terrifying, but it gives David a strange kind of hope.

Across the city, grieving families find themselves able to see their loved ones one last time. But are these creatures really them? How long can this last? And what does it all mean?

Handling the Undead is a thrilling, shocking and moving story about a love that can defy death from the acclaimed author of Let the Right One In.

I like the way Lindqvist writes. But he does not finish his stories in a way I like. Both Right One and Undead have endings that feel, to me, rushed. Tacked on because, damn it, books have to end somewhere.

Up to that point, an excellent read. After that point, a disappointment. I would recommend them anyway - you might like the endings, not feel dissatisfied the way I did. And the writing itself is superb.

From the Cover:

All Kindan ever wanted was to become a Harper, singing and teaching the ballads of Pern, and he is thrilled when he becomes an Apprentice at the Harper Hall. But then he is offered the chance to attend a Hatching and succeeds in Impressing the magnificent bronze fire-lizard, Valla.
There he meets Koriana, daughter of Lord Holder Bemin of Fort Hold. She also Impresses, in her case a gold fire-lizard, and there is an instant attraction between her and Kindan. Unfortunately an Apprentice Harper is not considered a suitable consort for a Fort Holder’s daughter and they are quickly separated. Things go from bad to worse for Kindan when he is accused of starting a fire which destroys ancient and extremely precious Records. He is banished to Fort Hold in shame and dishonour, but his own worries soon pale into insignificance when a terrible plague starts to spread across Pern, killing nearly everyone infected. As it reaches Fort Hold, Kindan and the rest of Pern’s inhabitants know there very survival is in doubt.
a proper Pern novel… bodes well for future volumes - SFX on Dragonsblood

Marge Piercy wrote a poem, which I cannot remember nor track down, about how a writer only has so much creativity, so should bury poems in the garden, against the lean years.
And Anne McCaffrey was, for me, the embodiement of this poem. The Pern books, which I loved from the very first time I read Weyr Search as a short story that won the Hugo in the year of release, gradually got less and less involving and more and more formulaic.
This collaborative effort with her son, Todd (not the first nor the last!) is a true Pern book whilst also suffering from the fact that I have read so, so many Pern books. This has nothing new to offer, no real developmentof character nor a gripping story. Yet I will be getting more, and reading them. Just without the satisfaction that a really well written book gives.
Another beach / journey / quick pickup read.

From the Cover:

All Kindan ever wanted was to become a Harper, singing and teaching the ballads of Pern, and he is thrilled when he becomes an Apprentice at the Harper Hall. But then he is offered the chance to attend a Hatching and succeeds in Impressing the magnificent bronze fire-lizard, Valla.

There he meets Koriana, daughter of Lord Holder Bemin of Fort Hold. She also Impresses, in her case a gold fire-lizard, and there is an instant attraction between her and Kindan. Unfortunately an Apprentice Harper is not considered a suitable consort for a Fort Holder’s daughter and they are quickly separated. Things go from bad to worse for Kindan when he is accused of starting a fire which destroys ancient and extremely precious Records. He is banished to Fort Hold in shame and dishonour, but his own worries soon pale into insignificance when a terrible plague starts to spread across Pern, killing nearly everyone infected. As it reaches Fort Hold, Kindan and the rest of Pern’s inhabitants know there very survival is in doubt.

a proper Pern novel… bodes well for future volumes - SFX on Dragonsblood

Marge Piercy wrote a poem, which I cannot remember nor track down, about how a writer only has so much creativity, so should bury poems in the garden, against the lean years.

And Anne McCaffrey was, for me, the embodiement of this poem. The Pern books, which I loved from the very first time I read Weyr Search as a short story that won the Hugo in the year of release, gradually got less and less involving and more and more formulaic.

This collaborative effort with her son, Todd (not the first nor the last!) is a true Pern book whilst also suffering from the fact that I have read so, so many Pern books. This has nothing new to offer, no real developmentof character nor a gripping story. Yet I will be getting more, and reading them. Just without the satisfaction that a really well written book gives.

Another beach / journey / quick pickup read.

From the Cover

What’s more frightening than your next-door neighbours being murdered?
Finding out the killers went to the wrong house…
For the Cutter family the idea that they may have been the intended target seems crazy - but each of them has a secret they’d rather keep buried. What was on that old computer teenage Derek and his friend Adam Langley had salvaged? And where is it now? What hold does a local professor and bestselling author have on Eileen Cutter? And what does Jim Cutter know about Mrs Langley that even her husband didn’t?
To find out who killed the Langleys and why, everybody’s secrets are going to have to come out. But the final secret - the secret that could save them or destroy them - is in the one place nobody would ever think of looking…

Linwood has done it again. Another page turner, another surprise ending. Though I did not find this as interesting, nor as well written as No Time for Goodbye, it is still a good book that will keep you entertained on your journey, or at the beach, or during your lunch hour.
Recommended.

From the Cover

What’s more frightening than your next-door neighbours being murdered?

Finding out the killers went to the wrong house…

For the Cutter family the idea that they may have been the intended target seems crazy - but each of them has a secret they’d rather keep buried. What was on that old computer teenage Derek and his friend Adam Langley had salvaged? And where is it now? What hold does a local professor and bestselling author have on Eileen Cutter? And what does Jim Cutter know about Mrs Langley that even her husband didn’t?

To find out who killed the Langleys and why, everybody’s secrets are going to have to come out. But the final secret - the secret that could save them or destroy them - is in the one place nobody would ever think of looking…

Linwood has done it again. Another page turner, another surprise ending. Though I did not find this as interesting, nor as well written as No Time for Goodbye, it is still a good book that will keep you entertained on your journey, or at the beach, or during your lunch hour.

Recommended.